4 Tips You Can Use When Trying A New Hair Style 4 Tips You Can Use When Trying A New Hair Style

22 Dec , 2016

Getting bored with whatever hairstyle you are currently rocking, is par for the course when it comes to women and hair. Even if you have the most bomb hairstyle you’ve ever had, you will eventually grow tired of it. Your inner diva will begin acting up and begging you to try something new that may be even better than what you have.

This happens to everyone and it shouldn’t be discouraged. Trying new things is how you come up with what works for you and what doesn’t. It’s also trial and error that have led to some of the best discoveries about how to style, cut and color hair.

With the new year quickly approaching, you may be considering changing things up. And while trying new things with your hair is a good thing, it can take a little tweaking before it ends up just right. To avoid the humiliation of a complete disaster while you tweak, take heed of the tips below and be calculated when trying new hairstyles.

New hairstyles can be anything from an adjustment to your regular haircut, to something like adding a pop of color. In between those two extremes, there are a million other little tweaks that can satisfy that urge within for something out of the ordinary. Many times, simply styling your hair in a way you never have before will do the trick.

1. Calm Down

First off, don’t get too excited. That moment of exhilaration when you see someone rocking an amazing style that you think would look equally amazing on you is fleeting. Try not to get caught up and lose sight of what you can, will and do want to do with your hair.

When you first get the feeling to change, give it a day or two or maybe even a week. If it’s still there, then find a hairstyle that fits with your lifestyle and goes for it. 

2. Be Realistic

Like I mentioned above, give yourself a minute to make sure that what you’re about to do to your hair is the right thing. Shaving your head and dying your peach fuzz blonde may feel completely right when you are sipping on a glass of red wine on a Saturday night and watching a countdown of Rock N Roll’s most rebellious women. How well that translates to the real world is to be taken into consideration.

Aside from extremes, something like trying a new type of twist and curl on your hair, may not turn out as beautifully as the tutorial shows it. You don’t have to be a Negative Nelly but go into it with expectations that are in line with your hair type, your face shape, and your skill level.

3. Timing Is Everything

When you try a new style can be the difference between you becoming the laughing stock of your office and you feeling like you’re on a runway all day because you look so good.

Try a new style when you have a long weekend. Fridays are best because they still allow for recovery time. If it all fails and your hair has to be completely redone from wash to style, you need time to do that and still complete whatever other life tasks you use your weekends to complete. Waiting until Sunday to try something new with your hair, is just risky business.

Another great time to try a new style is on casual Friday. If you aren’t doing a major overhaul and what you’re trying has little room for error, then casual Friday is a good time to try and pull it off. People are more forgiving, the weekend has everyone vibing and they’re honestly not paying as much attention to you as they might be at a different time of the week.

4. Adjust Accordingly

If new style calls for something that you know doesn’t agree with your normal routine, then go ahead and make the necessary adjustments before you do the style. There’s no need in doing something you already know will yield an undesirable result.

For instance, let’s say your hair is not tolerant of heat above 350 degrees and the style calls for a curl made with a curling iron set at 450 degrees. Just adjust the temperature. There is no hairstyle worth you burning out a chunk of your hair for.

The same goes for any tension that a particular style may cause on say, your edges, or the nape of your neck. If you’re in the process of babying your edges so they can recover from braids that were too tight, just skip the style altogether or make an adjustment that will benefit the health of your edges.

The grass is not always greener on the other side. It’s green where you water it. Keep that in mind before you jump the fence to a new hairstyle that you haven’t planned out.

Getting bored with whatever hairstyle you are currently rocking, is par for the course when it comes to women and hair. Even if you have the most bomb hairstyle you’ve ever had, you will eventually grow tired of it. Your inner diva will begin acting up and begging you to try something new that may be even better than what you have.

This happens to everyone and it shouldn’t be discouraged. Trying new things is how you come up with what works for you and what doesn’t. It’s also trial and error that have led to some of the best discoveries about how to style, cut and color hair.

With the new year quickly approaching, you may be considering changing things up. And while trying new things with your hair is a good thing, it can take a little tweaking before it ends up just right. To avoid the humiliation of a complete disaster while you tweak, take heed of the tips below and be calculated when trying new hairstyles.

New hairstyles can be anything from an adjustment to your regular haircut, to something like adding a pop of color. In between those two extremes, there are a million other little tweaks that can satisfy that urge within for something out of the ordinary. Many times, simply styling your hair in a way you never have before will do the trick.

1. Calm Down

First off, don’t get too excited. That moment of exhilaration when you see someone rocking an amazing style that you think would look equally amazing on you is fleeting. Try not to get caught up and lose sight of what you can, will and do want to do with your hair.

When you first get the feeling to change, give it a day or two or maybe even a week. If it’s still there, then find a hairstyle that fits with your lifestyle and goes for it. 

2. Be Realistic

Like I mentioned above, give yourself a minute to make sure that what you’re about to do to your hair is the right thing. Shaving your head and dying your peach fuzz blonde may feel completely right when you are sipping on a glass of red wine on a Saturday night and watching a countdown of Rock N Roll’s most rebellious women. How well that translates to the real world is to be taken into consideration.

Aside from extremes, something like trying a new type of twist and curl on your hair, may not turn out as beautifully as the tutorial shows it. You don’t have to be a Negative Nelly but go into it with expectations that are in line with your hair type, your face shape, and your skill level.

3. Timing Is Everything

When you try a new style can be the difference between you becoming the laughing stock of your office and you feeling like you’re on a runway all day because you look so good.

Try a new style when you have a long weekend. Fridays are best because they still allow for recovery time. If it all fails and your hair has to be completely redone from wash to style, you need time to do that and still complete whatever other life tasks you use your weekends to complete. Waiting until Sunday to try something new with your hair, is just risky business.

Another great time to try a new style is on casual Friday. If you aren’t doing a major overhaul and what you’re trying has little room for error, then casual Friday is a good time to try and pull it off. People are more forgiving, the weekend has everyone vibing and they’re honestly not paying as much attention to you as they might be at a different time of the week.

4. Adjust Accordingly

If new style calls for something that you know doesn’t agree with your normal routine, then go ahead and make the necessary adjustments before you do the style. There’s no need in doing something you already know will yield an undesirable result.

For instance, let’s say your hair is not tolerant of heat above 350 degrees and the style calls for a curl made with a curling iron set at 450 degrees. Just adjust the temperature. There is no hairstyle worth you burning out a chunk of your hair for.

The same goes for any tension that a particular style may cause on say, your edges, or the nape of your neck. If you’re in the process of babying your edges so they can recover from braids that were too tight, just skip the style altogether or make an adjustment that will benefit the health of your edges.

The grass is not always greener on the other side. It’s green where you water it. Keep that in mind before you jump the fence to a new hairstyle that you haven’t planned out.

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